Afghan Women Project


Web Workshop Outline
9/30/02
In this workshop we will briefly introduce, and explain the World Wide Web.
We will describe and define what you need for equipment and software to access the web, and introduce some necessary terms you will use to browse the web.
Finally, we will show you how to copy and paste information you find on the web,
into your own documents and folders.

1. What is the web?
10 minutes
How do you connect to the web?
What do you need for equipment and software?
What is a:
Browser- Software for searching the web (Internet Explorer or Netscape)
URL- Uniform Resource Locator (web address)
ISP – Internet Service Provider (AOL or Compuserve)
HTML- Hyper Text Markup Language (web formatting language)
Http - hyper text transfer protocol (the method of how electronic files transfer on the web)

2. Once you’re connected, how do you find what you need?
15 minutes
What are search engines?

A search engine is a software program, set up as a web page that gives web users access to information available on the net.
Examples: Google http://www.google.com
How do you use keywords to search the web?
Search Pathway Excercise:
Search Engine: Google
Browser: Internet Explorer
Keyword: Grantsmanship Center
Scroll: Global Fund for women
Drop down: International Funding
Asia
Apply for grant
Language - Dari

3. When you find what you want, how do you…
20 minutes
Bookmark the site?
Copy and paste text information, graphics and links into a word document?

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Searching the Web - Handout
This handout will give you a basic introduction to understanding how the web works, with an explanation of how to search web sites to best meet your needs and interest. Further, it will instruct you on how to bookmark favorite sites, and copy and paste important information and favorite links into your own documents. This guide will briefly answer common questions for beginning Internet users.

There are tutorial sources provided in the reference section for follow up practice.

What is the web?
How do you connect to the web? What equipment will you need?
What is a browser, URL, ISP, HTML, http?
Once you’re connected how do you find what you need? What are search engines?
When you find what you want, how do you bookmark the site?
How do you copy and paste information and links into a word document?

What is the web?
The Internet is a collection of computers and files that communicate with each other. The World Wide Web is a large group of files on the Internet containing a collection of electronic documents containing text, graphics and other media that are linked together like a giant spider web. The World Wide Web (or WWW) allows rich and diverse communication by displaying text, graphics, animation, photos, sound and video.

How do you connect to the web? What equipment will you need?
To connect to the World Wide Web, you will need a personal computer (or PC), a modem, web browser software, and a connection to an Internet service provider.

What is an ISP, web browser, links, URL, HTML, http?

The ISP- The ISP is an Internet service provider. America Online or MSN are commercial ISPs you may subscribe to, or you may have your own ISP available where you work or go to school for example we use CEO at the lab. It is through this provider that you receive your own Internet address for receiving e-mail. The ISP can also provide access to your browser of choice when you go “on line” by connecting to the Internet.
Web Browser- A web browser is the software program you use to access the World Wide Web. It allows your personal computer to communicate with other computers on the web. Although many different browsers are available, Microsoft Internet Explorer and Netscape Navigator are the two most popular ones.
Links- Links are shortcuts that take you from one web page (or site) to another. They are often in the form of graphics or text. The information contained in a link gives you the ability to jump from one webpage to another with just a click of your mouse.
URL- You can think of the World Wide Web as a collection of electronic files stored on computers all around the world. All of these webpages are linked together enabling you to jump from webpage to webpage. Uniform Resource Locators or URLs are the addresses used to locate these webpages. They are similar to a street address on a house. No two URL’s are exactly the same. When you type a URL into your browser or click on a link, your browser sends a request to the ISP to download the files. This is what a typical URL address looks like:
http://www.learnthenet.com

The first part of a URL (in this example ”http://”) tells you the type of resource or protocol to access that address. There are many types of protocols used on the Web, but “http” is the most common.

The second part of the URL (in this example www.learnthenet) is typically the address of the computer where the data or service is located. Additional parts may specify the names of a file, the port to connect to, or the text to search for in a database. In this URL the data is located on the world wide web (www) at Learn the Net.
The third part of this URL is the suffix (in this example it is “.com.”), this is telling you the type of website you are looking at. When looking at various URLs you will also see among others:
.net - for networks
.org - for organizations
.edu - for education
You enter the URL of a site by typing it into the Location bar of your web browser, just under the toolbar. Here are some other things to know about URLs:
A URL usually has no spaces.
A URL always uses forward slashes (//).
If you enter a URL incorrectly, your browser will not be able to locate the site or resource you want. Should you get an error message or access the wrong site, make sure you typed the address correctly.
You can find the URL behind any link by placing your cursor over the link. The pointer will turn into a hand and the URL will appear in your browser's status bar, usually located at the bottom of your screen.

HTML- Web pages are written in Hypertext Markup Language or HTML, which is the document format language used by the Web. When a browser loads a webpage, the HTML is converted from computer code into a viewable webpage. To test your knowledge about using the Internet so far click on this URL http://www.learnthenet.com/english/quiz/01quiz.htm

Looking at Web pages
On the Web, you navigate through pages of information based on what interests you at that particular moment, commonly known as browsing or surfing the Net. When you browse the World Wide Web you'll see the term home page often. Think of a home page as the starting point of a website. Like the table of contents of a book or magazine, the home page usually provides an overview of what you'll find at the website. A site can have one page, many pages or a few long ones. Web pages vary wildly in design and content, but many use a traditional magazine format. At the top of the page is a masthead or banner graphic, then a list of items, such as articles, often with a brief description. The items in the list usually link to other pages on the site, or to other sites. Sometimes these links are highlighted words in the body of the text, or are arranged in a list, like an index. They can also be a combination of both. A web page may also have images that link to other content.
Text links appear in a different color from the rest of the text--typically in blue and underlined. When you move your cursor over a text link or over a graphic link, it will change from an arrow to a hand. The hypertext words often hint at what you will link to. If you find a URL that is not active you can copy and paste it to your browser’s locator window and then “go” to that site.
If you “get lost” while looking through a site you can usually press “home page” or click through the back button on the browser window till you find your way back. Occasionally you may run into a “pop up” which is a separate screen on your browser. You may close that screen, or minimize it to return to the main browser screen.

Once you’re connected, how do you find what you need? What are search engines?
Finding what you are looking for on the Web is not very difficult if you know how to use a search engine. A search engine is a software program, set up as a web page that gives web users access to information available on the net. A typical search engine allows you to type in words or terms you are looking for. The search engine then “searches” the Internet and the World Wide Web for webpages that are related to your search terms. A list of possible matches is then displayed along with links to the matching webpages. The web can be overwhelming at first. The best way to feel comfortable is by spending time researching your own interests and needs.
Google http://www.google.com/
Google is my favorite search tool. With Google, you can connect to web sites, do research, copy and paste images, read news, find special interest groups and scan directories. I find it very efficient for most web searches. Google also has language tools to help browse and translate information.

The Basics of Google Web Search
To enter a query into Google, just type in a few descriptive words and hit the 'enter' key (or click on the Google Search button) for a list of relevant web pages. Since Google only returns web pages that contain all the words in your search, refining or narrowing your search is as simple as adding more words to the search terms you have already entered. Your new search will return a smaller subset of the pages Google found for your original "too-broad" search.

Choosing Keywords
For best results, it's important to choose your keywords wisely. Keep these tips in mind:
Try the obvious first. If you're looking for information on Picasso, enter "Picasso" rather than "painters".
Use words likely to appear on a site with the information you want. "Luxury hotel Dubuque" gets better results than "really nice places to spend the night in Dubuque".
Make keywords as specific as possible. "Antique lead soldiers" gets more relevant results than "old metal toys".
Example of keywords you might use for a grant search are:
“International Fundraising”
“International Philanthropy”
“International Funders”

Advanced Searches
Once you become adept at browsing the web you can make your searches more advanced. For example, if you want to browse web pages written in a particular language or format, choose the “advance search” button on Google to specify only those sites for browsing. For further help with advanced searches check the reference section.

When you find what you want on a web site how do you “book mark” the site?
Most browsers can store the URLs that you want to use again by allowing you to add them to a special list. Netscape Navigator calls it Bookmarks; Microsoft Explorer calls it Favorites. Once you add a URL to your list, you can return to that web page simply by clicking on the name in your list, instead of retyping the entire URL. Address. To save a URL address you want to keep for future reference:

1. Make sure the Web page you want is displayed
2. On Netscape, click Bookmarks on the Location Toolbar, the select Add Bookmark
3. On Internet Explorer, from the Favorites menu, select Add Page to Favorites. It will then ask you to specify the name by which you want to remember the Web page.
When you open either the Bookmark or the Favorites menu later, the web page is listed. Select it to go directly to that web page.

How do you copy and paste information from the web into a word document?
When you find text information in a site that you wish to copy off the web it is similar to opening a Microsoft Word program and using the same tools as you would with any document. The primary difference is that the formatting and graphics will not necessarily transfer because the web is using html language.

Text- For text open the MS Word program on your computer and open a new blank document (or existing one). Place the mouse cursor to one side of the selected web site text area clicking down on the mouse while dragging it over the text. This will highlight (shade blue) the chosen text. Release the mouse and the area will remain highlighted. With your cursor you then go up the Edit part of your tool bar in MS Word, and scroll down to Copy and click the mouse again and then release. This will copy the text, but you won’t see it till you paste. Think of this like storing information onto a temporary clipboard to be used later. Now open your word document, place your cursor where you want the text to be, and click. Then go up to edit and click down the mouse again, scroll down to Paste and release. The copied text will now appear on your word document.

Pictures- To copy pictures or graphics click on the graphic with the cursor then “right click” your mouse. A prompt window will open asking you where you want to save the image. Choose the document you want to save it to and select. Then open the document to see the saved image.
After you have finished “copying and pasting” information from the web to your word document you can then save that document by naming it and deciding what format you want it in plain text, html, rich text format and which part of your computer you wish it stored on such as your Desktop, Folder, Hard drive etc.
Links- If the information you wish to copy and paste is the URL itself, go to the location bar; highlight and copy/paste the address as you would text. Usually this link will be active if you are opening the document on your computer. You can test the link by placing your cursor over it on the document, to see if the arrow changes to a hand.

Reference Section
(I have not linked to these sites in my portfolio, but if you are interested in seeing them please copy and paste the address into the browser window)

Tutorials
http://www.ouc.bc.ca/libr/connect96/search.htm
Search engine tutorial produced by the University of Calgary
http://www.learnthenet.com/
Learn the net tutorial
http://searchenginewatch.com/facts/ataglance.html
Search Engine Math
http://www.magpie.org/life/
Magpie Internet tutorial (currently being updated 9/30/02)
Specialty Search Engines
For those times when you want to find more than just web pages and web sites, the "specialty search engine" below will prove useful. Also called topical search engines, "vertical" search engines or "vortals," they'll help you search through specific types of listings in different areas. To link to these topic areas below go to this URL http://searchenginewatch.com/links/specialty.html

Regional Search Engines
There are search engines and directories devoted to various countries and regions of the world. The categories below list some of the more prominent ones. You can link to these by going through this link.
http://searchenginewatch.com/links/Regional_Search_Engines/
Africa (17)
Americas (43)
Asia (49)
Australia and New Zealand (19)
Europe (175)
Middle East (18)
By Language (4)
Common Search Engines
Google
http://www.google.com
Yahoo
http://www.yahoo.com
Alta Vista
http://www.altavista.com
Ask Jeeves
http://www.askjeeves.com
Inktomi
http://www.inktomi.html
qbSearch
http://www.qbsearch.com
Want to get multiple pages of results from a search engine combined into one single page? QB-Search will quickly join up to 200 pages of listings from major search engines.
Infonetware RealTerm Search
http://www.infonetware.com
This site is primarily designed to demonstrate classification technology from Infogistics. It's a meta search engine, and it does topical classification of results, like Vivisimo. However, it is unique in that you can select several different topics, then "drill down" to see results from all of them, rather than being restricted to the results from only one topic.
SurfWax
http://www.surfwax.com
InfoGrid
http://www.infogrid.com
In a compact format, InfoGrid provides direct links to major search sites and topical web sites in different categories. Meta search and news searching is also offered.
ProFusion
http://www.profusion.com
Brings back listings from several major search engines as well as "Invisible Web" resources. Formerly based at the University of Kansas, the site was purchased by search company Intelliseek in April 2000.
Query Server
http://www.queryserver.com/web.htm
Search against major web-wide search engines, as well as major news, health, money and government search services.
Kartoo
http://www.kartoo.com
If you like the idea of seeing your web results visually, this meta search site shows the results with sites being interconnected by keywords.
Dogpile
http://www.dogpile.com
Popular metasearch site that sends a search to a customizable list of search engines, directories and specialty search sites, then displays results from each search engine individually. Owned by InfoSpace, which also owns MetaCrawler.
Mamma
http://www.mamma.com
Sends search requests to major search services.
MetaCrawler
http://www.metacrawler.com
One of the oldest meta search services, MetaCrawler began in July 1995 at the University of Washington. MetaCrawler was purchased by InfoSpace, an online content provider, in Feb. 97.
Search.com
http://www.search.com
Search.com is a meta search engine operated by CNET. It offers both web-wide search and a wide variety of specialty search options. Search.com uses technology from SavvySearch, which was acquired by CNET in October 1999. The SavvySearch site itself no longer operates. SavvySearch was one of the older metasearch services, around since May 1995 and formerly based at Colorado State University.
Flipper
http://www.flipper.com/
Flipper is a meta search engine that not only displays results from other search engines and from the Open Directory, but from sites that are part of the invisible web, as well. Most of these deep web sites are commercially oriented, but there are also useful information sites for things like music and films.
iBoogie
http://www.iboogie.tv/
iBoogie allows you to select results from the web, products or services from the "BuyWeb," or limit your queries to the deep web, images, video or audio. It also performs real-time clustering of results, creating a list of categories related to your search terms for easy browsing.
InfoGrid
http://www.infogrid.com
In a compact format, InfoGrid provides direct links to major search sites and topical web sites in different categories. Meta search and news searching is also offered.
Infonetware RealTerm Search
http://www.infonetware.com
This site is primarily designed to demonstrate classification technology from Infogistics. It's a meta search engine, and it does topical classification of results. However, it is unique in that you can select several different topics, then "drill down" to see results from all of them, rather than being restricted to the results from only one topic.Ithaki
http://www.ithaki.net/indexu.htm
Ithaki is probably the most "global" of all meta search engines, available in 14 languages and offering more than 35 different categories for limiting your search. In addition, Ithaki offers country specific search, querying only local search engines rather than the regional versions of the major search engines.
IxQuick
http://www.ixquick.com/
Meta search engine that ranks results based on the number of "top 10" rankings a site receives from the various search engines.
http://www.qbsearch.com
Want to get multiple pages of results from a search engine combined into one single page? QB-Search will quickly join up to 200 pages of listings from major search engines.
Query Server
http://www.queryserver.com/web.htm
Search against major web-wide search engines, as well as major news, health, money and government search services.
SearchOnline
http://www.searchonline.info/
SearchOnline is a relatively new service, but one that offers a highly flexible and customizable interface to a wide variety of information sources, ranging from general web results to specialized search resources in a number of subject specific categories.
Vivisimo
http://vivisimo.com/
Enter a search term, and Vivismo will not only pull back matching responses from major search engines but also automatically organize the pages into categories. Slick and easy to use.
Excite
http://www.excite.com
Formerly a crawler based search engine with its own index, it was transformed into a meta search engine when purchased by InfoSpace in 2001.
MetaCrawler
http://www.metacrawler.com
One of the oldest meta search services, MetaCrawler began in July 1995 at the University of Washington. MetaCrawler was purchased by InfoSpace, an online content provider, in Feb. 97.
Webcrawler
http://www.excite.com
Formerly a crawler based search engine using a much smaller subset of the Excite index, it was transformed into a meta search engine when purchased by InfoSpace in 2001.
The Big Four Meta Search Engines
SearchDay, September 17, 2002
http://searchenginewatch.com/searchday/02/sd0917-infospace.html
Though there are dozens of useful meta search engines, InfoSpace is the industry gorilla, operating the four arguably best known and most heavily used properties.
Search.com
http://www.search.com
Search.com is a meta search engine operated by CNET. It offers both web-wide search and a wide variety of specialty search options. Search.com uses technology from SavvySearch, which was acquired by CNET in October 1999. The SavvySearch site itself no longer operates. SavvySearch was one of the older metasearch services, around since May 1995 and formerly based at Colorado State University.
All-In-One Search Pages
http://searchenginewatch.com/links/allinone.html
Unlike metacrawlers, all-in-one search pages do not send your query to many search engines at the same time. Instead, they generally list a wide-variety of search engines and allow you to search at your choice without having to go directly to that search engine. See All-In-One Search Pages for a list of these type of resources.

Key search words:
“International Fundraising”
“International Philanthropy”
“International Funders”

Sites for Fundraising:
http://www.fdncenter.org
http://www.tgci.com/
http://www.internationaldonors.org/
http://www.asiafoundation.org/
http://www.gatesfoundation.org/
http://www.globalfundforwomen.org/
This is the link we used in the web workshop
http://www.kimseyfoundation.org/
http://www.ned.org/
http://www.ploughshares.org/site/index.html
http://www.3gf.org/
http://www.pewtrusts.com/
http://www.wgf.org/
http://www.hon.ch/Misc/Sponsor/aga_khan.html
http://www.acdi-cida.gc.ca/INDEX-E.HTM
http://www.comptonfoundation.org/
http://www.grantsmanagement.com/cfhguide.html
http://www.dsk.de/
http://www.empoweringminds.org/cfw.shtml
http://www.feedtheminds.org/Search Engine Software

There are many software packages that let you search from your desktop or navigate the web more easily. A comprehensive list of these can be found in the Search Utilities section of Search Links. Below, you'll find links to articles and reviews of various packages.
Teoma Offers Free Search Toolbar
SearchDay, June 25, 2002
http://searchenginewatch.com/searchday/02/sd0625-teomatool.html
Teoma has introduced the Teoma Search Bar, a free online navigational tool that lets you search Teoma.com while viewing any web page with Internet Explorer.
Search the Web via IM
InstantMessaging Planet, April 17, 2002
http://www.instantmessagingplanet.com/public/article/0,,10817_1012411,00.html
Describes Googlematic, which lets you ask Google to send the top five results to a search from with AOL's AIM client or from MSN Messenger.Searching & Navigating Via Internet Explorer
The Search Engine Update, April 2, 2002
http://searchenginewatch.com/subscribers/articles/02/04-ie.html
Everyone knows that the Internet Explorer browser lets you surf the web. But did you realize that Microsoft's popular browser also has some powerful search capabilities built into it? This article explores how IE lets you search and navigate on the web.
An "X-Ray" Toolbar for Web Surfers
SearchDay, Nov. 19, 2001
http://searchenginewatch.com/searchday/01/sd1119-alexa.html
The Alexa Toolbar aggregates all kinds of useful information about the site you're currently viewing, from contact info to related sites and categories, available with a simple click of a link.
Build Your Own Portable, Personal Search Engine
SearchDay, Nov. 27, 2001
http://searchenginewatch.com/searchday/01/sd1127-surfsaver.html
Take a page from Google's playbook and create a searchable cache of important web pages with your own portable, personal search engine.
Fyuse: An Eclectic "My" Portal
SearchDay, Nov. 26, 2001
http://searchenginewatch.com/searchday/01/sd1126-fyuse.html
Fyuse takes the concepts of web-clipping, push-technology, affiliation and distributed content and encapsulates them into a slick, easy to use personalized portal customized to your tastes.
Search Engines with Autopilot
SearchDay, Nov. 14, 2001
http://searchenginewatch.com/searchday/01/sd1114-autopilot.html
If you're often repeating the same query, you can both improve your results and take the drudgework out of searching by taking advantage of search engines that 'fly' on autopilot.
Intelliseek's BullsEye Turns 3 With Grace
About.com Web Search Guide, Oct. 9, 2001
http://websearch.about.com/library/searchtips/bltotd011009.htm
Review of the software-based search software BullsEye, which has meta search and invisible web search capabilities.
Bookmarks with Brawn
SearchDay, Oct. 4, 2001
http://searchenginewatch.com/searchday/01/sd1004-cociter.html
Co-citer is a simple but powerful replacement for Internet Explorer's wimpy 'favorites' manager -- and best of all, it's free.
Smarter Tools to Scour a Wider Web
Business Week, March 26, 2001
http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/01_13/b3725051.htm
Review of four search companions for your desktop.
Where Did All the Bots Go?
ClickZ, Jan. 17, 2001
http://clickz.com/cgi-bin/gt/article.html?article=3188Worth A Look: Flyswat
About Web Search Guide, Oct. 29, 1999
http://websearch.about.com/library/weekly/aa102999a.htm
Review of Flyswat, a navigational tool that lets you locate related web sites by highlighting words on a web page.
The Battle of the Browser Sidekicks
PC World, July 28, 1999
http://www.pcworld.com/pcwtoday/article/0,1510,12021,00.html
A review of add-ons that bring content from Yahoo and Excite to your desktop.ZDNet Software Library: Searching Software
http://www.zdnet.com/swlib/hot/spider.html
Top programs, rated, with the ability to download them directly from ZDNet. See which ones are being downloaded the most.

Other Resources
Afghanistan related sites of interest
: You will need to download Dari fonts to read these sites.
http://www.voanews.com/dari/
http://www.afghan-web.com/language/
http://www.afghan-network.net/
http://www.afghanistans.com/Concert/Music1.htm
http://host.bip.net/haqiqat.darinews/index.htmFont downloads
http://members.tripod.com/~khorasan/Miscellaneous/alphabet2.htm
http://www.paratype.com/default.asp?page=/library/languag?langCode=19

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Pictures of the women and the CITT designers in the lab are offered below.



You may also want to check out the links to the Afghan-U.S. Women's Council and the U.S. State Department to learn more about this educational event.

Click on this link:
http://usawc.state.gov/ to learn more about the U.S.-Afghan Women's Council.

Click on this link:
http://www.state.gov/secretary/rm/2002/13655.htm to read Secretary Colin Powell's remarks at the U.S.-Afghan Women’s Council’s "Women in Government" Reception.

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